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Mon cabinet de curiosités

découvertes étonnantes, amusantes ou jolies

Posts tagged automaton:

mazarinette:

‘La Joueuse de tympanon is a dulcimer playing ‘android’ or automaton. It was presented at Versailles in 1784 and bought by Marie Antoinette. It is believed that the android’s hair is that of the Queen.’

mazarinette:

‘La Joueuse de tympanon is a dulcimer playing ‘android’ or automaton. It was presented at Versailles in 1784 and bought by Marie Antoinette. It is believed that the android’s hair is that of the Queen.’

You really are an automaton - a calculating machine,” I cried. “There is something positively inhuman in you at times.

Watson about Holmes, The Sign Of Four, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

(via vicarsanstutu)

(Source: smellsliketangerine, via my-ear-trumpet)

callmetomorrow:

Something to fix.

callmetomorrow:

Something to fix.

Do you think I am an automaton? ­ a machine without feelings?…Do you think, because I am poor, obscure, plain, and little, I am soulless and heartless? You think wrong — I have as much soul as you, — and full as much heart…I am not talking to you now through the medium of custom, conventionalities, nor even of mortal flesh; — it is my spirit that addresses your spirit; just as if both had passed through the grave, and we stood at God’s feet, equal, — as we are

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte (via apigseyeviewofliterature)

mismatchedmarbles:

The above photograph is of a writing and drawing automaton built by the Swiss mechanician Henri Maillardet, who, for a period of time, worked under the watchmaker Pierre Jaquet-Droz.

Maillardet exhibited his Automaton throughout England, but after 1833, it is not known what became of the machine until its appearance in Philadelphia. Some think it possible that P.T. Barnum brought the machine to the United States; he knew Maelzel and may have purchased a number of mechanical objects through him. Barnum placed these wonders—including automata—in his museums, one of which was established at Seventh and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia. In 1851, that museum was destroyed by fire. Perhaps that was the fire that left Maillardet’s Automaton in need of such repair.


When first presented to the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia in 1928, the automaton was of unknown origin. Once restored to working order, the automaton itself provided the answer when it penned the words “written by the automaton of Maillardet”.

Below is a demonstration of the automaton at a book signing with Brian Selznick:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwkkDfs-RKg
For more information about the Maillardet automaton and for images of its poems and drawings, visit the Franklin Institute’s official website.  Or click on the picture, your choice.  (Just saying, it would be easier for you to click on the picture.)

mismatchedmarbles:

The above photograph is of a writing and drawing automaton built by the Swiss mechanician Henri Maillardet, who, for a period of time, worked under the watchmaker Pierre Jaquet-Droz.

Maillardet exhibited his Automaton throughout England, but after 1833, it is not known what became of the machine until its appearance in Philadelphia. Some think it possible that P.T. Barnum brought the machine to the United States; he knew Maelzel and may have purchased a number of mechanical objects through him. Barnum placed these wonders—including automata—in his museums, one of which was established at Seventh and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia. In 1851, that museum was destroyed by fire. Perhaps that was the fire that left Maillardet’s Automaton in need of such repair.

When first presented to the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia in 1928, the automaton was of unknown origin. Once restored to working order, the automaton itself provided the answer when it penned the words “written by the automaton of Maillardet”.

Below is a demonstration of the automaton at a book signing with Brian Selznick:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lwkkDfs-RKg

For more information about the Maillardet automaton and for images of its poems and drawings, visit the Franklin Institute’s official website.  Or click on the picture, your choice.  (Just saying, it would be easier for you to click on the picture.)

(via cecilbeatons)